Alpha Indicator Details


 Alpha 01 - Matrix

A combination of a number of Alpha Indicators with added value given to each one pattern or indicator.

 Alpha 02 - Keltner Bands

The Moving Average combined with a deviation from the moving average.

 Alpha 02b - SMA Detrend Indicator

View of the SMA Detrend to see how far the market moves from the Moving Average to help identify potential market turns or movement in one direction.

 Alpha 03 - Last Price

View a line across the screen based on the last current price level to see support and resistance.

 Alpha 04 - Cycle Wave Count

View all the cycle counts on your screen displayed automatically.

 Alpha 05 - Green Line

Walter Bressert Double Stoch is shorter length than the Yellow Line.

 Alpha 06 - Yellow Line

Walter Bressert Double Stoch is longer length than the Green Line.

 Alpha 07 - Red Line

Walter Bressert Indicator known as the B-Line, but better now using averages, bars and cycle counts.

 Alpha 08 - PPI

Combination of Green, Yellow and Red Lines plotted as one line with cycles and bars.

 Alpha 09 - DSI

The moving average plotted, then an average of the average like an indicator.

 Alpha 10 - Volume - VMI

See first hand how many contracts bought at the offer versus sold at the bid and averaged out and plotted like a candle stick chart.

 Alpha 11 – Tick Range Delta

View the volume difference based on the tick ranges. plotted horizontally.

 Alpha 12 - Bar Tick Delta Chart

View the volume difference on each bar at different levels of the same bar.

 Alpha 13 - Support / Resistance

View support and resistance going back any number of cycle counts.

 Alpha 14 - Market Spread

View a weight market spread between any 2 markets.

 Alpha 15 - OHL Levels

View the Open, High, Low and % percentage levels on your charts of the day's range.

 Alpha 16 - Net Long / Short

View how many contract you are long or short and where you added them on your bar charts.

 Alpha 17 - True Average Price

Learn what the true average price of your position is rather than what clearing sends back using first in and first out (FIFO)

 Alpha 18 - Bar Tick Range Average

See how far on average each bar's range is to calculate your entries and exits.

 Alpha 19 - Ops Lines

See on 3 different price charts if you are above or below the previous bar's open using 3 different time frames at once.

 Alpha 20 - Average Profit/Loss

See what the average profit or loss is for each contract that is opened.

Alpha Hunters Explained


ALPHA HUNTERS - INDICATORS


Identify New Trading Opportunities With Alpha Hunters Indicators.

Key Features -

  • Our charts look more stable and directional by removing what we believe to be distracting price noise in rough markets.
  • Automatic cycle counting in real-time.
  • One of a kind volume delta views.
  • Tracks your true net position and real average price over the entire life of the trade, rather than the FIFO method, which can be confusing.
  • Tracks your per contract open profit / loss in real time as you add and remove contracts.
  • Combine multiple indicators into one single average of our key indicators to simplify your view and save space.

More -

  • All the Alpha Indicators have been time tested over the years.
  • Engaging traders to better predict when the trend will continue or reverse.
  • Volume delta indicators are unique as we measure how many contracts were bought at the offer and sold at the bid and chart this as a candlestick chart.
  • Alpha Hunters Smooth Charts come with the Indicator package.
  • Chart templates are provided for easy setup.

Trade Models we use every day

Free Demo

Get a demo on all apps at the same time

Free 14 Day Demo

Risk Statement


The risk of loss in trading commodity interests can be substantial. You should therefore carefully consider whether such trading is suitable for you considering your financial condition. In considering whether to trade or to authorize someone else to trade for you, you should be aware of the following: if you purchase a commodity option you may sustain a total loss of the premium and of all transaction costs.

If you purchase or sell a commodity futures contract or sell a commodity option or engage in off-exchange foreign currency trading, you may sustain a total loss of the initial margin funds or security deposit and any additional funds that you deposit with your broker to establish or maintain your position. If the market moves against your position, you may be called upon by your broker to deposit a substantial amount of additional margin funds, on short notice, to maintain your position.

If you do not provide the requested funds within the prescribed time, your position may be liquidated at a loss, and you will be liable for any resulting deficit in your account. Under certain market conditions, you may find it difficult or impossible to liquidate a position. This can occur, for example, when the market makes a "limit move." the placement of contingent orders by you or your trading advisor, such as a "stop-loss" or "stop-limit" order, will not necessarily limit your losses to the intended amounts, since market conditions may make it impossible to execute such orders. A "spread" position may not be less risky than a simple "long" or "short" position. The high degree of leverage that is often obtainable in commodity interest trading can work against you as well as for you. The use of leverage can lead to large losses as well as gains. In some cases, managed commodity accounts are subject to substantial charges for management and advisory fees.

It may be necessary for those accounts that are subject to these charges to make substantial trading profits to avoid depletion or exhaustion of their assets. This disclosure document contains, this brief statement cannot disclose all the risks and other significant aspects of the commodity interest markets. You should therefore carefully study this disclosure document and commodity interest trading before you trade, including the description of the principal risk factors of this investment. This commodity trading advisor is prohibited by law from accepting funds in the trading advisor's name from a client for trading commodity interests. You must place all funds for trading in this trading program directly with a futures commission merchant or retail foreign exchange dealer, as applicable.

The following statement is furnished pursuant to Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) Regulation 1.55(c). This brief statement does not disclose all of the risks and other significant aspects of trading in futures, Forex and options. In light of the risks, you should undertake such transactions only if you understand the nature of the contracts (and contractual relationships) into which you are entering and the extent of your exposure to risk. Trading in futures, Forex and options is not suitable for many members of the public. You should carefully consider whether trading is appropriate for you in light of your experience, objectives, financial resources and other relevant circumstances.

The risk of loss in trading commodity futures contracts and foreign currency can be substantial. You should, therefore, carefully consider whether such trading is suitable for you in light of your circumstances and financial resources. You should be aware of the following points:

You may sustain a total loss of the funds that you deposit with your broker to establish or maintain a position in the commodity futures market or foreign exchange market, and you may incur losses beyond these amounts. If the market moves against your position, you may be called upon by your broker to deposit a substantial amount of additional margin funds, on short notice, in order to maintain your position. If you do not provide the required funds within the time required by your broker, your position may be liquidated at a loss, and you will be liable for any resulting deficit in your account.

The funds you deposit with a futures commission merchant for trading futures and forex positions are not protected by insurance in the event of the bankruptcy or insolvency of the futures commission merchant, or in the event your funds are misappropriated.

The funds you deposit with a futures commission merchant for trading futures or forex positions are not protected by the Securities Investor Protection Corporation even if the futures commission merchant is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission as a broker or dealer.

The funds you deposit with a futures commission merchant are generally not guaranteed or insured by a derivatives clearing organization in the event of the bankruptcy or insolvency of the futures commission merchant, or if the futures commission merchant is otherwise unable to refund your funds. Certain derivatives clearing organizations, however, may have programs that provide limited insurance to customers. You should inquire of your futures commission merchant whether your funds will be insured by a derivatives clearing organization and you should understand the benefits and limitations of such insurance programs.

The funds you deposit with a futures commission merchant are not held by the futures commission merchant in a separate account for your benefit. Futures commission merchants commingle the funds received from customers in one or more accounts and you may be exposed to losses incurred by other customers if the futures commission merchant does not have sufficient capital to cover such other customers’ trading losses.

The funds you deposit with a futures commission merchant may be invested by the futures commission merchant in certain types of financial instruments that have been approved by the Commission for such investments. Permitted investments are listed in Commission Regulation 1.25 and include U.S. government securities; municipal securities; money market mutual funds; and certain corporate notes and bonds. The futures commission merchant may retain the interest, and other earnings realized from its investment of customer funds. You should be familiar with the types of financial instruments that a futures commission merchant may invest customer funds in.

Futures commission merchants are permitted to deposit customer funds with affiliated entities, such as affiliated banks, securities brokers or dealers, or foreign brokers. You should inquire as to whether your futures commission merchant deposits funds with affiliates and assess whether such deposits by the futures commission merchant with its affiliates increases the risks to your funds.

You should consult your futures commission merchant concerning the nature of the protections available to safeguard funds or property deposited for your account.

Under certain market conditions, you may find it difficult or impossible to liquidate a position. This can occur, for example, when the market reaches a daily price fluctuation limit (“limit move”).

All futures, forex and options positions involve risk, and a “spread” position may not be less risky than an outright “long” or “short” position.

The high degree of leverage (gearing) that is often obtainable in futures and forex trading because of the small margin requirements can work against you as well as for you. Leverage (gearing) can lead to large losses as well as gains.

In addition to the risks noted in the paragraphs enumerated above, you should be familiar with the futures commission merchant you select to entrust your funds for trading futures positions. As of July 12, 2014, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission requires each futures commission merchant to make publicly available on its Web site firm-specific disclosures and financial information to assist you with your assessment and selection of a futures commission merchant. ALL OF THE POINTS NOTED ABOVE APPLY TO ALL FUTURES AND FOREX TRADING WHETHER FOREIGN OR DOMESTIC. IN ADDITION, IF YOU ARE CONTEMPLATING TRADING FOREIGN FUTURES OR OPTIONS CONTRACTS, YOU SHOULD BE AWARE OF THE FOLLOWING ADDITIONAL RISKS:

Foreign futures transactions involve executing and clearing trades on a foreign exchange. This is the case even if the foreign exchange is formally “linked” to a domestic exchange, whereby a trade executed on one exchange liquidates or establishes a position on the other exchange. No domestic organization regulates the activities of a foreign exchange, including the execution, delivery, and clearing of transactions on such an exchange, and no domestic regulator has the power to compel enforcement of the rules of the foreign exchange or the laws of the foreign country.

Moreover, such laws or regulations will vary depending on the foreign country in which the transaction occurs. For these reasons, customers who trade on foreign exchanges may not be afforded certain of the protections which apply to domestic transactions, including the right to use domestic alternative dispute resolution procedures. In particular, funds received from customers to margin foreign futures transactions may not be provided the same protections as funds received to margin futures transactions on domestic exchanges. Before you trade, you should familiarize yourself with the foreign rules which will apply to your particular transaction.

Finally, you should be aware that the price of any foreign futures or option contract and, therefore, the potential profit and loss resulting therefrom, may be affected by any fluctuation in the foreign exchange rate between the time the order is placed and the foreign futures contract is liquidated, or the foreign option contract is liquidated or exercised.

THIS BRIEF STATEMENT CANNOT, OF COURSE, DISCLOSE ALL THE RISKS AND OTHER ASPECTS OF THE COMMODITY AND FOREIGN CURRENCY MARKETS.